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Description and Holding Information
1862-1941, Burma Acts & Orders
Collection of acts passed by the Lieutenant-Governor of Burma in Council, Rangoon, Gvt Printer, 1898- (A supplementary publication to this run that
covers the little legislation that was issued in the form of Governor’s Acts during the WWII years is entitled : “Compendium of Governor’s Acts
published in India, 1942-1945”; see LLMC Title No. 10989. For most of the British period Burma was administered as a province of the British Indian Empire.
Legislation consisted of India Acts with application to Burma, or local regulations enacted by the Lieutenant-Governor of Burma in Council. Under the
Government of Burma Act, 1935, Burma’s status was considerably elevated. Effective 1 April 1937, Burma was separated from India and became a separate
crown colony, with its own Governor-General. Certain measures of local self-government were introduced, but most important powers remained reserved to
the Governor, who, assisted by his Council, governed by ordinance. World War II signaled the end of British rule in Burma. Japan invaded the country
early in 1941. By May it effectively controlled all of the lowland plain. Accompanying the Japanese and contributing meaningfully to its campaign was a
“Burma Independence Army” {BNA} headed by Aung San., which had been recruited earlier in Thailand. By 1945, with the Japanese in full retreat, the
BNA under Aung San switched to the side of the returning British. The taste of independence during the war insured that there could be no going back to
pre-war conditions. Aung San established the Anti-Fascist People’s Freedom League {AFPFL)}, which quickly won massive support throughout the country.
By October of 1946 the AFPFL had won representation within the Governor’s Council. Shortly thereafter the British Labor Government expressed its
willingness to abide by a referendum of the Burmese people. The AFPFL won the elections for a constituent assembly, and soon Aung San and his associates
were effectively running the internal affairs of the country. The movement toward independence suffered a serious setback on 19 July 19 1947, when Aung
San and many of his closest associates were assassinated during a cabinet meeting. However, a reasonable degree of stability was soon restored, and
the negotiations toward independence moved forward under the new Burmese leader, U Nu. On 17 October 1947, a treaty with Great Britain provided for an
independent republic called the Union of Burma, which came into existence on 4 January 1948.)
Title:   [Burma acts]
OCLC Number:   906028831
Available Volumes
NameFiche CountOnlinePaper Backup
1900YesNo
1901YesNo
1902YesNo
1903YesNo
1904YesNo
1905YesNo
1906YesNo
1907YesNo
1908YesNo
1909YesNo
1910YesNo
1911YesNo
1912YesNo
1913YesNo
1914YesNo
1915YesNo
1916YesNo
1917YesNo
1918YesNo
1919YesNo
1920YesNo
1921YesNo
1922YesNo
1923YesNo
1924YesNo
1925YesNo
1926YesNo
1927YesNo
1928YesNo
1929YesNo
1930YesNo
1931YesNo
1932YesNo
1933YesNo
1934YesNo
1935YesNo
1936YesNo
1937YesNo
1938YesNo
1939YesNo
1940YesNo
1941YesNo
1942-1945YesNo
1946YesNo
1947YesNo
1948YesNo